Ready to discover another great book for this 2020? Take a look…

Number 10 by CJ Daugherty

Genre: Young Adult Mystery
Source: Midas PR
Rating: 4/5
Publisher: Moonflower Books
Amazon

About The Book

After a wild night with friends is splashed across the tabloids, Gray is grounded for two weeks at Number 10 Downing Street, no ifs no buts.
Left alone one night, with her mother at an important meeting, Gray discovers a secret network of government tunnels leading from 10 Downing Street to the Houses of Parliament and beyond.  What starts as a bit of fun, suddenly gets serious, when Gray stumbles across a secret late night cabinet meeting and overhears what sounds like a Russian-led plot to kill her mother.
Wasting no time, she rushes back to inform her mother’s security detail, but with no proof of what she heard, no-one will believe a wayward teenager. Now, it’s up to Gray to break out of Number 10 and warn her mother before it’s too late.
With the help of her best friend Chloe and love interest Jake McIntyre – who just happens to be the son of the leader of the opposition – will she make it in time to save her mother?  And what will she have to sacrifice in the process?


My Thoughts

Being a teenager is never an easy period, not for the youngsters nor for the parents, imagine if you are the daughter of the British Prime Minister, it will be hell, let’s be honest!
I’ll admit that I read this book in one stand, I couldn’t put it down, it was not difficult to discover who was the bad of the story, but I was curious to know how they would expose everything and how Gray wouls keep her mother safe, really addictive!
The story is told from the Gray perspective, you only see drops of her mother (who I didn’t like much) and some memories of her father (who seems to be traveling all the time). So when Gray is grounded and has to spend 3 weeks closed at Number 10, it didn’t surprise me that she started to investigate why everyone was keeping her in the dark and what was really happening with her mother, if everyone lied to her, she needed to find the truth by herself, don’t you think?
I didn’t like much the adult characters of the story, only Gray’s bodyguard, Julia, the only one who really wants to tell her the truth, treats her like an adult and believes in her; really, Gray’s parents need to improve a lot! There’s one thing that I didn’t like much of the story, the ending, I need to read the second book of the story right now, it seems more interesting even than this book! The plot is closed, but it seems that Gray’s adventure has not ended…Ready to enter “Number 10”?


About The Author

C.J. Daugherty was 22 when she saw her first dead body. Although she’s now left the world of crime reporting she has never lost her fascination with what it is that drives some people to do awful things as well as the kind of people who will try to stop them. While working as a civil servant she visited No. 10 Downing Street and saw people disappearing into a small door with her own eyes – this became the inspiration for the novel Number 10. 
A former crime reporter and accidental civil servant, C.J. Daugherty began writing the Night School series while working as a communications consultant for the Home Office. The young adult series was published by Little Brown and went on to sell over a million and a half copies worldwide. A web series inspired by the books clocked up well over a million views. In 2020, the books were optioned for television. She later wrote The Echo Killing series, published by St Martin’s Press, and co-wrote the fantasy series, The Secret Fire, with French author Carina Rosenfeld.
While working as a civil servant, she had meetings at Number 10 Downing Street, and saw people disappearing through a small door leading to a staircase heading below ground level. This visit became the inspiration for Number 10.  FYI: She still doesn’t know if there are tunnels below Number 10. But she hopes there are. 
Her books have been translated into 25 languages and been bestsellers in multiple countries. She lives with her husband, the BAFTA nominated filmmaker, Jack Jewers.